The Origins of Halloween

Emily Vargas, Reporter

Halloween is known for a day for the family to dress up and go house by house for some trick or treating candies. Little do people know, the origin from where it all began to how it is today.”

Are you trick or treating??

  • Yes, I'm getting my candy! (67%, 2 Votes)
  • Yes, but I'm with a family member under the age of 12 (33%, 1 Votes)
  • No, but I would with a younger cousin, niece, nephew.. etc. (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Nope, I am too old! (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Nope, I'm passing out candy! (0%, 0 Votes)
  • We aren't home... (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 2

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Halloween is the spookiest time of the year. As many know, it is the holiday celebrated every year on October 31. Halloween is known for a day for the family to dress up and go house by house for some trick or treating candies. Little do people know, the origin from where it all began to how it is today. There are many different perspectives and theories that have marked all the way back from 43 A. D. to 1745, which influenced Halloween in the mid 19th century. 

One of the two most well known traditions that Halloween was said to believe it originated from was all the way back from a group of British warriors known as the Celtics. They celebrated a holiday called Samhain or November in English. Samhain was celebrated at the end of October it was one of their most important holidays as it represented the transition from summer to winter. The Celts believed that on this night those who had died in the previous years could walk the earth. They also believed that they had to appease the spirits by marching down their villages with offerings to try to encourage the spirits to stay away from their homes. They would also leave food and drinks outside for the dead. This would eventually lead into the influence of traditional trick or treating. 

In the second most well known tradition is the All Hallows’ Eve. It began in the Allhallowtide which originated from Pagan in the churchical year of dedicating the remembering of the dead. For the most part, included mostly saints during the time of remembering the dead for appreciation and gratitude. Around the time of 1745 the title Halloween used to be Hallowe’en which represented as Saints’ evening that eventually became All Hallows’ Eve, the day before. The Celtic harvest festival influenced this new tradition into getting together for the commemoration of all saints and good souls. Eventually, in the mid 19th century as the immigrants from northern Europe came into American, brought it into society and changed over the years to how it is celebrated today.